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Missouri bill would criminalize celebratory gunshots

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The Missouri legislature has passed a bill banning celebratory gunshots as part of a broader crime bill.

The bill, also known as Blair’s Law, was passed by the legislature recently and was sent to Missouri Governor Mike Parson on Thursday, according to FOX 2 in St. Louis.

Blair Shanahan Lane, the legislation’s namesake, died on July 4, 2011 when he was hit in the neck by a falling bullet when she was just 11-years-old in Independence, Missouri.

The suspect, Aaron Sullivan, pleaded guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter as a result of the incident.

A gun

FILE — A Taran tactical combat master hand gun is displayed for sale, June 23, 2022, in Hempstead, New York. A sweeping new gun law in New York that would require applicants to hand over social media information before they could carry a gun in public while declaring bucolic parks, bustling Times Square and a long list of other places off limits for firearms is scheduled to take effect on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2022, amid legal battles and lingering confusion.  (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman, File)

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Sullivan was the owner of the gun and admitted that he and other people fired the gun to celebrate. He spent 18 months in prison.

Blair’s mother, Michele Shanahan DeMoss, has become an advocate for the bill’s passage.

Man holds silver pistol at gun store

A man chooses a gun April 18, 2007, at the Gun Gallery in Glendale, California. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images)

According to the bill’s language, “a person commits the offense of unlawful discharge of a firearm if, with criminal negligence, he or she discharges a firearm within or into the limits of a municipality.”

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Mike Parson

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (Rich Sugg/The Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

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An individual’s first offense would be charged as a class A misdemeanor, a class E felony for the second time, and any time after that would be a class D felony.



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Caleb Alexander

Caleb Alexander

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