Web Analytics Made Easy - Statcounter

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee says she is ‘clear recipient’ of affirmative action

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn


Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, said Tuesday that she is the “clear recipient” of affirmative action as she took aim at the Supreme Court from the House floor over its “wrongheaded” ruling to reject the use of race as a factor in college admissions.

Working alongside her colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus, Lee said she will “proceed to analyze the very wrongheaded decision that was made by the United States Supreme Court on the question of affirmative action.”

“I rise today as a clear recipient of affirmative action, particularly in higher education,” she added. “I may have been admitted on affirmative action, both in terms of being a woman and a woman of color, but I can declare that I did not graduate on affirmative action. This is my personal story.”

AOC RIDICULED FOR VIRAL TAKE ON LEGACY ADMISSIONS FOLLOWING SUPREME COURT’S AFFIRMATIVE ACTION RULING

Sheila Jackson Lee

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, said Tuesday that she is the “clear recipient” of affirmative action, two weeks after the Supreme Court’s ruling. (Marcus Ingram/Getty Images)

Lee’s comments came two weeks after the high court ruled that the use of race as a factor in college admissions is a violation of the 14th Amendment’s equal protection clause.

In a 6-3 decision, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the majority opinion that, “A benefit to a student who overcame racial discrim­ination, for example, must be tied to that student’s courage and determination.”

“Or a benefit to a student whose herit­age or culture motivated him or her to assume a leadership role or attain a particular goal must be tied to that student’s unique ability to contribute to the university. In other words, the student must be treated based on his or her ex­periences as an individual—not on the basis of race,” the opinion reads.

‘SIT DOWN’: WARREN MOCKED FOR PAST CLAIMS OF NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE AFTER BASHING AFFIRMATIVE ACTION RULING

“Many universities have for too long done just the oppo­site. And in doing so, they have concluded, wrongly, that the touchstone of an individual’s identity is not challenges bested, skills built, or lessons learned but the color of their skin. Our constitutional history does not tolerate that choice,” the opinion states.

United States Supreme Court (front row L-R) Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, and Associate Justice Elena Kagan, (back row L-R) Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh and Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson pose for their official portrait

Members of the Supreme Court pose for their official portrait at the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court building on October 7, 2022, in Washington, DC.
(Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Justice Roberts was joined by Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote the main dissent, joined by Justices Elena Kagan and in part by Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, who recused herself from the Harvard case due to her previous role on Harvard’s Board of Overseers.

Fox News’ Anders Hagstrom, Brianna Herlihy, and Bill Mears contributed to this report.



Source link

Caleb Alexander

Caleb Alexander

Sign up for our Newsletter

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit